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Sentence Classification According to Structure
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Part V - Medieval Britain

SENTENCE TYPES

SIMPLE....COMPOUND....COMPLEX...COMPOUND-COMPLEX

***Notice the punctuation of these sentence types.***

Sentences are classified, according to form, as simple, compound, complex and compound-complex. The two

main elements of a sentence are the subject and verb. A group of words with a subject and verb is called a

clause. Some clauses are complete statements, and therefore independent clauses; others are dependent upon

some word, or words, in another clause for their meaning.

A SIMPLE SENTENCE has only one subject and one verb. An independent clause is the same as a simple

sentence.

Ex: Good students work hard.

A COMPOUND SENTENCE consists of two or more independent clauses.

Ex: Students work hard, and they succeed.

(Note that these two clauses are joined by a comma followed by a coordinating conjunction.

The only coordinating conjunctions are: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so.)

A COMPLEX SENTENCE consists of one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses.

Ex: When students work hard, they succeed.

dependent clause followed by an independent clause

Ex: Students succeed when they work hard.

independent clause followed by a dependent clause

A COMPOUND-COMPLEX SENTENCE consists of two independent clauses and one or more dependent

clauses.

Ex: If he is motivated, a student will work hard, and he will succeed.

Look at the following sentences and determine the sentence classification. (Answers on last page.)

1. When Mother turned to tell the boys her answer, they were asleep.

2. Her smile was bright, and it brought an answering smile from Andrew.

3. When I lost my passport, I ordered a new one, but I did not worry about it.

4. It beat against the windshield with a light, prickling sound.

5. The driving snow that had whirled furiously now turned into tiny flakes.

Source: http://www.gpc.edu/~lawowl/handouts/sentence-types.pdf

 
 

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